This Week at CUA
May 30 - June 6 View Archives
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Calendar

Guests on Campus

Upcoming Events


Announcements
Summer Opera Theatre Presents Cendrillon
Cardinal Station Training for Staff
Raymond A. DuFour Center Summer Hours

Health and Safety
National Safety Month

Calendar
Monday, May 30
Memorial Day. University closed.

Friday, June 3, and Saturday, June 4
Reunions Weekend, classes of 1960, 1965, 1970, 1975, 1980, 1985 and 1990. See
http://alumni.cua.edu/reunions/reunionshome.cfm for more information.

Sunday, June 5, to Wednesday, June 8
The Program in Early Christian Studies sponsors a conference titled “Early Christian Studies and the Academic Disciplines." Registration is open for the conference but closed for on-campus housing and the opening dinner. Registration fees are waived for members of the CUA community. Caldwell Hall auditorium and the Life Cycle Institute auditorium. For more information, contact Catherine Peters at 202-319-5216 or
peters@cua.edu.
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Guests on Campus

Wednesday, June 1, to Sunday, June 5
CUA provides accommodations and meals for 20 students placed in Washington, D.C., internships by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops' Catholic Campaign for Human Development. For more information, visit www.usccb.org.

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Upcoming Events

Sunday, June 12, to Sunday, June 19
The Summer Opera Theatre Company stages a performance of Cendrillon, by Jules Massenet, conducted by H. Teri Murai. Hartke Theatre. For more information, see "Announcements" below.

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Announcements
Summer Opera Theatre Presents Cendrillon
The Summer Opera Theatre Company, a professional, independent company in residence at CUA, stages Jules Massenet's  Cendrillon (a new and updated version) at 2:30 p.m. on June 12; 7:30 p.m. (with a free lecture at 6:30 p.m.) on June 15; 7:30 p.m. on June 17; and 2:30 p.m. on June 19.


CUA alumni Maureen Francis, B.M. 1992, and Rolando Sanz, B.M. 2000, make their Summer Opera debuts as Cinderella and The Prince. Other CUA alumni singing principal roles in Cendrillon include Jennifer Jellings, B.M. 1999, Brian Cali, B.M. 2005, and Kristin Green, B.M. 2003. Benjamin T. Rome School of Music voice instructor Eugene Galvin appears as Cinderella’s Father.


This production, suitable for children as well as adults, is conducted by H. Teri Murai of the Peabody Conservatory of Music. Presented with full orchestra, the performance is in French with English surtitles.


For ticket reservations, contact the Hartke Theatre Box Office at 202-319-4000. For more information, contact Deanne Giarraputo, Summer Opera Theatre general manager, or
Ryan Manning, administrative associate, at 202-526-1669.

Cardinal Station Training for Staff
The Office of Business Services is offering “Training for Cardinal Station: PeopleSoft Student Administration v8.0” to university staff. This course is designed to familiarize new administrative support staff and refresh current users with the necessary navigational skills for Cardinal Station. It loosely follows the structure of the Navigation Training Guide available at http://cardinalstation.cua.edu.

Each class is limited to five participants. Specific areas of training will be determined by the needs of those in attendance. Training will be held in Leahy Hall, LL 40, on designated Tuesdays from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. The dates for summer training are:

— May 31
— June 14
— June 28
— July 12
— July 26
— Aug. 9
— Aug. 23

For more information or to register, contact Rana Silver at silver@cua.edu.

Dates, locations and times for the fall 2005 training term will be announced in August.

Raymond A. DuFour Center Summer Hours
The Department of Athletics announces that the Raymond A. DuFour Center is now operating under revised summer hours. The athletic center is open Monday through Friday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The pool is open Monday through Friday, from noon to 5 p.m. For more information, contact the Department of Athletics at 202-319-5286.

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Health and Safety

National Safety Month
June is “National Safety Month.” To help promote safety across the board this summer and throughout the year, this year's theme is “Safety Where We Live, Work and Play.”

Where We Live
With the  temperatures getting warmer, the desire to be outside and to cook outside increases. There are many safety tips to follow when cooking out.

When preparing food most important, meats and fish many precautions should be taken, varying from marinating to cooking.  Marinating should always be done in the refrigerator in a tightly closed container. Always try to reduce the amount of air in contact with meat.  Never reuse marinade after it comes in contact with raw meat, and make sure all surfaces that come in contact with raw meat are cleaned thoroughly before putting cooked foods on them.  The United States Department of Agriculture recommends using a meat thermometer and cooking various meats at different temperatures.  Some common temperatures are 160 degrees Fahrenheit for hamburgers and all pork products; 145 F for steaks, chops and roasts; 165 F for ground poultry; 170 F for poultry breasts; and 180 F for whole poultry.

When grilling with a gas grill, inspect it for faulty or deteriorating parts and connections, and check the propane cylinder for leaky hoses and connections (following the manufacturer’s instructions). If those instructions are not available, a soapy water solution can be applied to the hoses and connections. (Look for larger bubbles being formed.)  Charcoal grills produce carbon monoxide, so proper ventilation should always be a concern. Always treat fire with respect!

Where We Work
During the summer, working outside increases. This can pose serious threats to human health caused by heat exhaustion or heatstroke. These are both forms of dehydration. Many factors including size, weight, health and age can affect the body’s hydration rate. Always drink plenty of water prior to doing any type of work outside in the heat. If you experience symptoms such as dizziness, fatigue, irritability and muscle cramps, and you believe you are at risk of heat exhaustion, remove yourself from the heat and drink water.  By neglecting to remove yourself from the heat you risk going into hyperthermia, or heatstroke, which can be fatal.

Where We Play
Though an inviting place to visit during the summer months, the beach can be very dangerous as well.  Rip currents  columns of water moving away from the shore are responsible for about 100 deaths a year and each year account for the majority of lifeguard rescues.  Their intensity directly correlates with the size of the waves and conditions of the ocean. It is believed that the majority of rip current deaths occur when inexperienced ocean swimmers panic and succumb to physical exhaustion.  If caught in a rip current, swim parallel to the shore to get out of the current, and then swim at an angle toward the shore using the waves to aid you. If unable to get out, don't panic, but float or tread water and try to draw attention to yourself. In many cases the current will spit you out and the waves will take you back toward shore. 

For more information, contact Will Wood at 202-319-5865.


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This Week @ CUA is published weekly during the academic year. Please submit items to the Office of Public Affairs.
202-319-5600 • Fax 202-319-4440 • E-mail cua-public-affairs@cua.edu
Items must include a phone number and contact person. The next issue will begin Monday, June 6, 2005.
Deadline is 5 p.m., Wednesday, June 1, 2005. CUA's Calendar of Events is updated regularly at http://www.cua.edu.

This Week @ CUA
Please direct address corrections to:
cua-public-affairs@cua.edu.